There’s been a great hullabaloo about “the Battery Problem” with the new iPhone 4S. Lot’s of stink and griping about yet another lousy product from Apple.

Sadly, a lot of those making the noise are industry professionals who should know better, but don’t seem to care. Never mind the problems galore that devices using Google’s Android operating system, or Microsoft’s mobile device OS seem to routinely suffer.

It’s all about bashing one of the top technology companies in the world just because it’s Apple.

If anyone had really been paying attention to ‘the problem’ and not the symptom, it might have dawned on them that all devices currently running iOS 5.0 were being affected . Which means iPads, iPods and iPhones. Even those already owned and only recently upgraded to the new iOS version… were suddenly having the same problem!

Which means, folks, that the problem is not in the hardware. So can we stop griping about the battery… please?

Where the problem is… is in the power management routines in the Operating System… caused by the enabling of features in the hardware that until now had been purposely left  switched ‘off’… because the functions weren’t enabled in previous releases of iOS.

This is intelligent product life-cycle planning. Building in features and functions you know you want to include but not enabling functionality because you’re going to turn it and other features on in future releases of the operating system.

In my opinion, this is a nice bonus for the device owner as it certainly goes along way in proving the ROI on cost-of-ownership. It is not ‘ building a fat product full of useless technology’.

… unlike some products on the marketplace that obsolesce as soon as a ‘new and improved’ product is released because they don’t bother to think past now, or don’t give a damn about the cash-cow … I mean, the end-user.

As a systems engineer, I have first hand experience with just how touchy it can be to get it ‘just right’ … and it can go wrong so easily. With a major OS release there are thousands of potential problems that can come back to bite you.

Thankfully, the problem’s been found, the code’s been fixed and is being tested, and soon the symptom will go away. Apple does a fantastic job of it, thanks in part to it’s corporate culture, but also to the dedication of its engineers and designers to product quality.

And just a note to the whiners: I’ve run into power management issues on products from every manufacturer of laptop, notebook and mobile device manufactured over the past twenty plus years.

…and I expect to see more of them in the future.

I’ll tell you why later.

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